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Amanda Proctor announces candidacy for the Third Osage Nation Congress

"Amanda recently assisted the Housing Authority of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma with the successful closing of its first Low-Income Housing Tax Credit project, which resulted in nearly 4 million dollars of outside investor equity for the Seminole Nation."
Amanda Proctor announces candidacy for the Third Osage Nation Congress. Courtesy Photo

Amanda S. Proctor is a graduate of Harvard University and the University of Tulsa College of Law, where she earned the Native American law certificate and the oil and gas law certificate.  In 2005, Amanda became one of the few graduate students to receive the University's Marcy Lawless Award for Excellence in Service to the Community.

Prior to entering law school, Amanda served as a program director for three Native American tribes.  As a tribal housing director, Amanda facilitated large land acquisitions, the development of two low-income housing subdivisions and the operation of an adult foster care (assisted living) facility as a HUD-approved model activity.  She successfully designed and implemented a number of housing programs, including home repair and rehabilitation, home acquisition, down payment and closing cost assistance, air conditioner assistance, winterization and an emergency housing assistance program.  Amanda is well-versed in all aspects of federal program compliance, including grant acquisition, environmental due diligence and performance reporting requirements.    

As an attorney, Amanda advises and counsels Indian tribes and tribal entities throughout Oklahoma, including those involved with gaming and social services.  However, the special emphasis of her law practice is Indian housing.  Amanda recently assisted the Housing Authority of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma with the successful closing of its first Low-Income Housing Tax Credit project, which resulted in nearly 4 million dollars of outside investor equity for the Seminole Nation.    “

Amanda also has commenced and managed complex litigation on behalf of tribes and individual Indians, including Osage tribal members.  As such, she has developed a strong working knowledge of the 1906 Act of Congress and all amendatory acts. 

Amanda was listed in the 2010 and 2011 editions of the "Super Lawyers" directory, and was one of only two lawyers recognized in the Indian law practice category for those years.  Amanda is licensed to practice law in Oklahoma state courts, the federal courts for the Northern and Western Districts of Oklahoma and the tribal courts of the Osage, Cherokee, Iowa, Ponca and Muscogee (Creek) Nations.  She currently serves as the President of the Osage County Bar Association.

Amanda is at home under the arbor or in the arena, having participated from an early age in the Native American cultural community.  She founded the Harvard University Powwow in 1995 and the University of Tulsa Native Justice Powwow in 2005.  She frequently serves on the head staff of powwows throughout the United States and Canada.