Share |

Real Men Wear Purple

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month
Real Men Wear Purple participants, from L to R: Cory Spotted Bear, Benny Polacca, Jasper Clark, Harold Hughs, Jeremy Spotted Bear and Everett Waller pose in support for men against domestic violence. Photo by Shannon Shaw/Osage News
Real Men Wear Purple participants, from L to R: Cory Spotted Bear, Benny Polacca, Jasper Clark, Harold Hughs, Jeremy Spotted Bear and Everett Waller pose in support for men against domestic violence. Photo by Shannon Shaw/Osage News

Men wearing purple shirts were all smiles as they lined up for a photo outside of the Osage Counseling Center in downtown Pawhuska. The photo will be made into a poster for Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

The men had volunteered their time Sept. 9 to pose for the photo, wearing their purple shirts. Purple being the DVAM official color.

“I just want to thank all the participants who came by to support this cause,” said LaVina Clark, domestic violence administrator for the counseling center. "To know that these men support Domestic Violence Awareness Month is heartening."

Each of the real men received a ticket for a door prize in which Everett Waller, liaison to the Osage Minerals Council and cultural adviser in Chief John Red Eagle’s administration, won a $50 gift card. A long-time Hominy resident and Hominy Buck fan, Waller even wore his purple shoes.

According to the Domestic Violence Awareness Project Web site, DVAM evolved from the “Day of Unity” in October 1981, conceived by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The intent was to connect advocates across the country who were working to end violence against women and their children. The Day of Unity soon became an entire week devoted to a range of activities conducted at the local, state, and national levels, according to the site.

Activities for the month vary and are diverse. Common themes done by program sponsors include: mourning those who have died because of domestic violence, celebrating those who have survived, and connecting those who work to end violence.

In October 1987, the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month was observed. That same year marks the initiation of the first national domestic violence toll-free hotline. In 1989 the U.S. Congress passed Public Law 101-112 designating October of that year as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Such legislation has passed every year since with NCADV providing key leadership in this effort, according to the site. Each year, the Day of Unity is celebrated the first Monday of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. If you are in danger and need help, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at (800) 799-SAFE (7233) or TTY (800) 787-3224.

For more information about Osage Nation DVAM activities from the ON Counseling Center, call (918) 287-5425.

Location

Pawhuska, OK
United States

Comments

Kelly M. Bray, I think maybe if you feel the way you do, then you should start a program or a shelter for men that are abused in relationships. This is not about "feminist", as you call them, to be just one sided it's about making people aware of domestic violence. You may think that they are being one-sided about the situation, but you're down playing children and women. I think it's silly for someone to state they don't help men, when they in fact do. So your comments and remarks are very unresearched when you don't know the facts.I hope you start something up for men that are in abusive relationships, because that would only help the fight against domestic violence. Thank you!

I am so sick of hearing the tired feminist rant that women and children are the only victims of domestic violence. And the corollary that men are the only perpetrators. The truth is that women commit domestic violence equally with men. The truth is that in many relationships the violence is mutual. The truth is that men who are the victims of domestic violence are often arrested when they defend themselves or try to report it. The truth is that no one cares about the men who endure abusive relationships to protect their children. The truth is that there are almost no services for abused men. The truth is that violence in lesbian relationships (no men) is as high as heterosexual relationships. The truth is that children are far more likely to be abused or killed by their mothers than by their fathers.